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Herod the Great's Tomb May Not Be His

Herod the Great's Tomb May Not Be His Oct 25th, 2013 at 1:02PM: Wikimedia Commons Israel is a country filled with ancient sites. One of the more popular ones to visit is the Herodium, the palace of the infamous Herod the Great, now part of a national park just outside Jerusalem. Herod was a lavish builder and created quite the crib between 23-15 BC. The historian Josephus, writing half a century after Herod's death, says that when the king died in 4 BC, he...

Valencia: Spain's Third City Offers Culture And Cuisine

Valencia: Spain's Third City Offers Culture And Cuisine Jul 18th, 2013 at 5:30PM: Sean McLachlan There's a well-worn tourist trail in Spain: Madrid for the art, Barcelona for the nightlife and the Costa del Sol for the beaches. All of these are great, but there are plenty of other spots that often slip under the radar. Valencia, for example, gets plenty of tourists from Europe yet seems to not get so many Americans. I hardly saw any in the past three days....

Venice: Grand Vistas And Little Details

Venice: Grand Vistas And Little Details Jun 21st, 2013 at 12:00PM: Sean McLachlan On my first day in Venice I walked the streets without a camera in order to savor the beauties of this unparalleled city. I was leaving the next afternoon so that morning I got up at dawn in order to catch Venice at its abandoned best. It's a different city, more peaceful. You can linger on a bridge or take a shot from the middle of a street without getting trampled. You can...

Archaeologists Digging At Lincoln Castle Uncover Early Christian Community

Archaeologists Digging At Lincoln Castle Uncover Early Christian Community May 17th, 2013 at 3:00PM: Lincolnshire County Council Archaeologists excavating at Lincoln Castle have discovered the remains of an early Christian community, according to a Lincolnshire County Council press release. The team, which was digging inside the castle to clear the way for an elevator shaft, found the remains of a church that dates back at least 1,000 years. Inside a sealed niche in the wall they found human...

Famous Roman 'Tomb' May Have Actually Been A Temple

Famous Roman 'Tomb' May Have Actually Been A Temple May 12th, 2013 at 10:00AM: At the Roman necropolis in Carmona, Spain, visitors are led to the popular "Elephant's Tomb," a large underground chamber that gets its name from a crude sculpture of an elephant found there. Now archaeologists are saying it may not be a tomb at all, but rather a temple to one of the ancient world's most mysterious religions. A team from the University of Pablo de Olavide, Seville, has analyzed...

Roman London Uncovered In Massive Excavation

Roman London Uncovered In Massive Excavation Apr 11th, 2013 at 1:00PM: Archaeologists from the Museum of London have uncovered three acres of Roman London, they announced in a press release. The team was excavating ahead of construction of Bloomberg Place, in the heart of what used to be Londinium, the capital of the Roman province of Britannia. Over the course of six months, archaeologists picked their way through seven meters of soil to find some 10,000...

Forget Paris, Try Lyon

Forget Paris, Try Lyon Apr 8th, 2013 at 10:00AM: It was nighttime when I first pulled into France's second-largest city, by car, and the lights were on – a wash of royal blue shining up onto orderly rows of stately Renaissance buildings in ochre hues and reflecting in the river that bisects the city. Handsome was the word that came to mind. A masculine gold-and-sapphire answer to Paris's ravishing, soulful beauty. This was the...

British Museum Opens Exhibition On Life And Death In Pompeii And Herculaneum

British Museum Opens Exhibition On Life And Death In Pompeii And Herculaneum Mar 28th, 2013 at 9:00AM: Today the British Museum in London opens what is sure to be the hit exhibition of the year. "Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum" examines the daily life of the Roman world, as it was preserved in two cities buried under volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Through fine art and mundane objects, we get to see what life was like for ordinary Romans. Romans like...

Israel Restores Ancient City

Israel Restores Ancient City Feb 1st, 2013 at 4:00PM: The government of Israel has just completed a $2 million restoration of the ancient Nabatean city of Avdat, The Jewish Press reports. Avdat is in the Negev Desert and was one of the westernmost points on an extensive incense trade network the Nabateans built stretching as far as the southern Saudi peninsula that flourished from the 3rd century B.C. to the 2nd century A.D. Incense was...

Ancient 'Toilet Paper' Discovered In Fishbourne Roman Palace

Ancient 'Toilet Paper' Discovered In Fishbourne Roman Palace Jan 31st, 2013 at 2:00PM: An examination of some strange ceramic disks found at the Fishbourne Roman Palace is changing how we look at some of the most private aspects of Roman life. Excavations at the palace in the past 50 years have uncovered dozens of pieces of broken pottery that had been deliberately shaped into flat disks. Archaeologists tentatively called them gaming pieces but were never convinced that was...

Naughty Roman Frescoes Uncovered In Colosseum

Naughty Roman Frescoes Uncovered In Colosseum Jan 12th, 2013 at 2:00PM: Archaeologists working on a conservation project at the Colosseum in Rome have discovered ancient frescoes of gladiators and erotic scenes, Agence France Press reports. The brightly colored fragments were found on the walls of a corridor currently closed to the public for restoration. The scenes show gladiators being honored with laurels. There are also erotic scenes, although the researchers...

Temple To Phallic God Priapus Found In Bulgaria?

Temple To Phallic God Priapus Found In Bulgaria? Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:00AM: There's something weird going on in the Bulgarian Black Sea port of Sozopol. Last year, Bulgarian archaeologists dug up the graves of two vampires and analyzed the purported bones of John the Baptist. Now the Sofia Globe reports they've found a temple to the Classical god Priapus. This deity, best known for his huge erect penis, was the god of fertility and its opposite – erectile...

Tourist Trinkets From The Roman Empire

Tourist Trinkets From The Roman Empire Dec 21st, 2012 at 9:00AM: The Roman Empire is remarkably familiar to the modern eye. It had highways, indoor plumbing, religious tolerance, and even fashion violations such as wearing socks with sandals. It's like a primitive version of our own culture, with more similarities than differences. And now it turns out they had tourist trinkets too. A press release from Hadrian's Wall Trust announces that a new book...

Padlocks Of Love Removed From Bridge In Rome

Padlocks Of Love Removed From Bridge In Rome Sep 12th, 2012 at 2:00PM: Officials in Rome have removed the so-called "padlocks of love" from the famous Ponte Milvio, the BBC reports. This is the latest phase of an ongoing struggle between the city and romantic couples that we've been reporting on since 2007. It all started when Italian novelist Frederico Moccia wrote "I Want You," in which a couple put a bicycle lock around the bridge's lamppost and tossed the key...

Roman Cavalry Helmet To Be Star Attraction At Royal Academy Exhibition

Roman Cavalry Helmet To Be Star Attraction At Royal Academy Exhibition Sep 10th, 2012 at 4:00PM: A new exhibition at the Royal Academy in London will feature one of Britain's most stunning archaeological discoveries of the past few years. Back in 2010, a metal detectorist found this brass helmet in a field in Cumbria, northern England. It dates from the first to third centuries A.D. and is one of a few rare ornate cavalry helmets dating to the Roman period. These helmets were worn for...

Archaeologists Discover Key To An Ancient City's Wealth

Archaeologists Discover Key To An Ancient City's Wealth Sep 6th, 2012 at 2:00PM: A couple of months ago we reported on how archaeologists discovered how the ancient city of Palmyra in Syria thrived in the desert. A complex system of canals and cisterns trapped the sparse but regular rainfall. Residents of another ancient city, Petra in Jordan, appear to have taken advantage of desert water to support their civilization too. Jordanian and Dutch archaeologists have...

Hiking A Roman Road In England

Hiking A Roman Road In England Sep 4th, 2012 at 2:00PM: At first glance this looks like a muddy field with an Australian contract lawyer walking away into the middle distance. Look again, though, and you'll notice something strange. Why is there no substantial vegetation in a big straight swath through this field? The answer is that it's a Roman road. Only a few inches below the soil are the original stones laid down 2,000 years ago when this was...

Hadrian's Wall To Be Turned Into World's Longest Work Of Art

Hadrian's Wall To Be Turned Into World's Longest Work Of Art Aug 24th, 2012 at 4:00PM: Hadrian's Wall has been the traditional boundary between England and Scotland ever since it was built by the Romans in the second century A.D. This 73-mile long structure was once the northernmost limit of the Roman Empire. As part of the London 2012 Festival, the New York-based artists' collective YesYesNo will light up the entire length with a series of tethered balloons lit by internal LED...

Ancient Curses Uncovered In Two Countries

Ancient Curses Uncovered In Two Countries May 25th, 2012 at 12:00PM: It's been a good week for ancient curses. A "cursing stone" has been discovered on the Isle of Canna, Scotland. More precisely called a bullaun stone, they're natural or artificial depressions in a stone that catch rainwater and give it magical properties, usually to heal or to help women conceive a child. A shaped stone is placed in the hole that's turned to make a prayer or curse. The...

Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit

Roman Fort Attacked By Moles, Archaeologists Benefit Apr 26th, 2012 at 3:00PM: When you stroll through a museum, you generally assume that all those ancient artifacts you're seeing were dug up by professional archaeologists or found by accident by some farmer plowing his field. Mostly you'd be correct, but researchers into England's Roman past are getting some unexpected help. . .from moles. Moles at the site of Epiacum, a Roman fort dating from the first to the fourth...

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