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Finding My Inner Foodie In Sicily

Finding My Inner Foodie In Sicily Jun 26th, 2013 at 12:00PM: Meg Nesterov I really hate the F-word. I think it's overused, lazy and borderline offensive. I'm talking about the word "foodie," a concept we have rallied against here before, yet the movement seems to stay strong and keep evolving with the advent of the latest bacon Frankenstein dish or artisanal ketchup. I do love food, and sometimes a meal (or more often for me, a really good peach) can be...

Photo Of The Day: Sri Lanka Temple

Photo Of The Day: Sri Lanka Temple May 30th, 2013 at 6:00PM: Jaliyaj, Flickr I've been traveling vicariously this week through my aunt who is temporarily based in Singapore and exploring Sri Lanka right now. The south Asian country has been on my wish list for years, ever since I learned the capital from playing "Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?" and imagined it was a place where my bartender might be an international jewel thief with an eye patch. On...

Video: Spinning Gold In Istanbul's Grand Bazaar

May 29th, 2013 at 1:00PM: Earlier this year in Istanbul, I was lucky enough to stumble upon a man who spins gold thread at the Grand Bazaar. His noisy workshop is tucked into a courtyard off one of the bazaar's main "streets," past a few jewelry kiosks and before a reasonably clean but squat-style toilet. Huge fan belts crisscross the room and antique machines creak and spin spools of thread in metallic and bright...

The Kimchi-ite: Life As A Foreigner In Asia

The Kimchi-ite: Life As A Foreigner In Asia Dec 17th, 2012 at 1:00PM: As a tall, blonde-haired, blue-eyed, white American living in Asia, I tend to stand out in a crowd. It's an interesting and bizarre thing that has become a part of my everyday life. Even living in Seoul, one of the biggest cities in the world, where more and more people of different ethnicities come every year, children on the subway stare at me unabashedly, store employees sometimes get...

The Kimchi-ite: The Culture Shock Of South Korea

The Kimchi-ite: The Culture Shock Of South Korea Dec 13th, 2012 at 9:00AM: When I moved to South Korea, it was my first time in the country and I had no idea what to expect. Going from the airport to my new apartment, differences from my prior life slowly came into focus. Signs were now written in lines and circles I didn't understand, brand new glass skyscrapers were poised next to traditional tile-roofed houses and all the cars were made by Hyundai. As I walked...

Think Globally, Eat Locally At Culinary Backstreets

Think Globally, Eat Locally At Culinary Backstreets Jul 28th, 2012 at 11:00AM: Budget-savvy and food-loving visitors to Istanbul have found an excellent resource in Istanbul Eats for several years, and now can find more authentic and off-the-beaten-path tips in Athens, Barcelona, and Shanghai, with Mexico City on the way. Culinary Backstreets was launched this week as an extension of IstanbulEats.com, a blog reviewing Turkey's best street food, hole-in-the-wall restaurants...

In Praise Of Service Journalism

In Praise Of Service Journalism May 9th, 2012 at 11:00AM: My career in the travel world started out by pure luck. I was assigned to work a temp office gig in the PR department of Condé Nast Traveler for two weeks, which turned into two years at the magazine, four more at a PR agency for hotels and travel providers and two more here at Gadling. Before and throughout my career, I've always been a major consumer of travel media, whether I've used it...

Get Anything Hand-Delivered By Travelers From Anywhere

Get Anything Hand-Delivered By Travelers From Anywhere May 4th, 2012 at 9:30AM: In my two years as an expat in Istanbul, I've asked visiting friends to bring me everything from bacon to Ziploc bags and iPads, and in return, I visit home with boxes of Turkish delight, baklava and coffee. But for those long winter months when I don't know anyone visiting Turkey, how am I supposed to get my chocolate-and-peanut-butter fix? Now there's a social network that connects locals and...

Expat fusion cuisine: combining foreign foods with favorites from home

Expat fusion cuisine: combining foreign foods with favorites from home Oct 14th, 2011 at 9:00AM: Part of the fun of traveling is trying new and exotic foods. Many travelers try to eat only locally and eschew the familiar, though eating at American chain restaurants abroad can be its own experience. But when you make a foreign country your home, you have to adapt your tastes and cooking to what's available locally while craving your favorites from home. I'm lucky enough to live in Istanbul...

Five things I'll miss about Madrid (and four things I won't)

Five things I'll miss about Madrid (and four things I won't) Sep 9th, 2011 at 12:00PM: After six years of living part-time in Madrid, my family and I are moving to Santander, a port in northern Spain. Leaving a European capital of three million people for a regional city of less than 200,000 is going to be a big change. Santander is in Cantabria, part of the rainy northern part of the country commonly called Green Spain. Stay turned for articles about this often overlooked region...

Knocked up abroad: baby shopping in a foreign country

Knocked up abroad: baby shopping in a foreign country Jun 21st, 2011 at 1:00PM: Knocked up abroad has been on a bit of a hiatus as my travel schedule has slowed and the due date has sped up. Feel free to catch up with posts on pregnancy travel, Turkish superstitions, medical care, and naming children. I'm into the final month of my pregnancy in Istanbul and that means the countdown is on to get stocked up with wee tiny baby things, garishly colored toys and furniture,...

VIDEO: Istanbul in 1967

Jun 6th, 2011 at 11:00AM: As an expat in Istanbul, I enjoy seeing anything Turkey-related, and this vintage video of the former Constantinople is especially fun to see. Narrated by a droll British commentator, you travel over and around Istanbul, checking out some of the big sights such as Hagia Sofia and the Blue Mosque, as well as life on the Bosphorus before the bridges were constructed to provide alternate access...

How to be a good house guest when visiting a friend abroad

How to be a good house guest when visiting a friend abroad May 16th, 2011 at 12:00PM: If you ever have a friend living abroad or meet someone traveling who extends you an invitation to come to their city, take advantage of the opportunity and go visit. Seeing the city with the help and knowledge of a local or native is invaluable, especially if they know you and your point of view, plus it can save you money in travel expenses (see more reasons to visit a friend from Mike Barish,...

Ode to the expat newspaper

Ode to the expat newspaper May 3rd, 2011 at 3:00PM: One of my favorite things about traveling, in addition to foreign supermarkets, oddball museums, and miniature toiletries, is the local English-language expat newspaper. When I'm home in New York, I tend to get all my news online, either directly from news websites through specific searches or curated from friends' links on social media (one of the best sources for news from US newspapers is...

Knocked up abroad: Turkish superstitions on pregnancy and children

Knocked up abroad: Turkish superstitions on pregnancy and children Mar 30th, 2011 at 2:00PM: Being pregnant in a foreign country, even as a traveler, gives you a unique perspective into a culture, their beliefs and practices, and values. While I've been in Istanbul, I've found Turkish superstitions to apply to all aspects of life, pregnancy and children no exception. Over the past six months, I've heard a lot of interesting customs and beliefs, some of them wackier than others. Turks love...

Where are all the travel guide apps for Android?

Where are all the travel guide apps for Android? Mar 25th, 2011 at 11:00AM: Nearly two years ago, I bought my first smartphone: the T-Mobile Android MyTouch*. I'm only occasionally jealous of my iPhone-carrying friends, as I find few travel guide apps for Android. Even after a move to Istanbul, I still use and rely upon it daily; Android's interface is fast and easy-to-use, and seamless use of Google applications like Gmail and Google Maps is part of the reason I bought...

Cockpit Chronicles: It's official. I'm moving to Germany

Cockpit Chronicles: It's official. I'm moving to Germany Mar 16th, 2011 at 8:00AM: Apparently I've run out of things to complain about, aside from the occasional gripe about the glossiness of the paint on the office walls which was supposed to be flat. There is little in my life that I can truly complain about, especially in light of the current events unfolding after the earthquake in Japan this week. Let's live a little, shall we? Both my wife and I have discussed...

Knocked up abroad: getting pregnant in a foreign country

Knocked up abroad: getting pregnant in a foreign country Feb 16th, 2011 at 2:30PM: My first clue that something was different came when I woke up one night on vacation in Kiev at 3am, proceeded to eat 3 slices of toast with caviar spread, went back to bed and woke up a few hours later wondering if they made blueberry muffins in Ukraine (tragicially, they do not). That "time of the month" hadn't happened but flying tends to always mess with your body, so I didn't give it much...

Weekending: Varna, Bulgaria

Weekending: Varna, Bulgaria Dec 8th, 2010 at 11:30AM: Back in September, the end of the Muslim month of Ramadan offered locals and expats like me an excuse to go on holiday while our American friends were celebrating the end of summer and Labor Day. With more time to explore than a typical Weekending trip, I checked out Turkey's most western neighbor, Bulgaria, and fell in love with modern and medieval captials Sofia and Veliko Tarnovo. The...

Five tips for an expat Thanksgiving

Five tips for an expat Thanksgiving Nov 25th, 2010 at 10:00AM: Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! I know some of you are reading this far from the USA, so I thought I'd let you know how I used to make expat Thanksgiving work. I went to college in England, which means that for three years, I had Thanksgiving as an expatriate. To this day, some of those memories remain among my favorites of any Thanksgiving spent anywhere, from realizing students from other programs...

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