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Ancient City Of Mohenjodaro May Disappear In Twenty Years

Ancient City Of Mohenjodaro May Disappear In Twenty Years Oct 21st, 2013 at 9:00AM: Wikimedia Commons The remains of the world's oldest planned city may crumble to dust in twenty years if action isn't taken, the Telegraph reports. Mohenjodaro, a 5,000 year-old city in Pakistan, is under threat from extreme temperatures and monsoon rains, which leave deposits of salt on the unbaked clay bricks that were used to create its buildings. That salt leeches out any moisture in the...

Spanish Cave Paintings Discovered to be Some of the Oldest in Europe

Spanish Cave Paintings Discovered to be Some of the Oldest in Europe Sep 26th, 2013 at 10:00AM: Image courtesy GipuzkoaKultura Cave paintings at the Altxerri cave system in the Basque region of northern Spain are about 39,000 years old, making them some of the oldest in Europe, Popular Archaeology reports. A team of French and Spanish scientists analyzed the paintings, which include images such as the bison shown here, as well as finger marks, a feline, a bear, an unidentified animal...

Archaeologists Looking At Stonehenge In A New Light

Archaeologists Looking At Stonehenge In A New Light Sep 3rd, 2013 at 10:30AM: Stonehenge is the world's most iconic prehistoric monument. Scientists have argued about its significance for generations, but few have been allowed to excavate there. Archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson is one of those lucky few, and he's documented his finds in a new book. Stonehenge: A New Understanding chronicles a seven-year excavation of Stonehenge and the surrounding countryside. ...

The Aboriginal Art Of Australia's Kakadu National Park

The Aboriginal Art Of Australia's Kakadu National Park Jul 17th, 2013 at 3:00PM: Kraig Becker Australia's vast and wild Northern Territory holds a number of wonders for visitors to discover, not the least of which is Kakadu National Park. Spread out across more than 7600 square miles, the park is the true embodiment of the Outback with a rugged and unforgiving landscape that includes some of the most breathtaking scenery that can be found anywhere on the entire continent. But...

UNESCO Reports Damage To Timbuktu Worse Than Previously Reported

UNESCO Reports Damage To Timbuktu Worse Than Previously Reported Jun 12th, 2013 at 3:30PM: Emilio Labrador A team from UNESCO has visited Timbuktu in Mali to make its first on-the-ground assessment of the damage caused by last year's occupation by the Islamist group Ansar Dine (Defenders of Faith). The group took over Timbuktu in April 2012 and imposed a harsh form of Shariah law. Believing the city's famous shrines and medieval manuscripts to be against Islam, even though they...

Could Bahrain Become The Next Big Heritage Tourism Destination?

Could Bahrain Become The Next Big Heritage Tourism Destination? May 21st, 2013 at 11:00AM: Desert Island Boy, flickr The tiny Persian Gulf island nation of Bahrain is home to one of the most mysterious ancient civilizations of the Middle East. Archaeologists have long known about a civilization called Dilmun. It's mentioned in many Mesopotamian texts as a wealthy place of "sweet water." Even the Epic of Gilgamesh mentions it, but all the sources were vague about its location. It...

Gambia And UK Open Fort Bullen Museum, A Bastion Against The Slave Trade

Gambia And UK Open Fort Bullen Museum, A Bastion Against The Slave Trade Apr 22nd, 2013 at 4:00PM: A fort in The Gambia that was instrumental in stopping the slave trade has been given a new museum, the Daily Observer reports. Fort Bullen was one of two forts at the mouth of the River Gambia, placed there in 1826 to stop slave ships from sailing out into the Atlantic. It stands on the north bank of the river, and along with Fort James on the south bank constitutes a UNESCO World Heritage...

International Budget Guide 2013: Oaxaca, Mexico

International Budget Guide 2013: Oaxaca, Mexico Apr 15th, 2013 at 11:00AM: If you are seeking an authentic and affordable taste of Mexico, look no further than Oaxaca. The southwestern Mexican city has come a long way since the political protests of 2006, where non-violent activists clashed with corrupt government officials and militia in the streets. The protests led to a renewed sense of self-awareness and confidence for the city, and today, Oaxaca is once again...

Industry Destroys Part Of The Nazca Lines

Industry Destroys Part Of The Nazca Lines Apr 11th, 2013 at 4:00PM: A limestone quarrying company operating illegally within the bounds of the Nazca Lines has destroyed some of the enigmatic figures. The archaeology news feed Past Horizons reports that heavy machinery removing limestone from a nearby quarry has damaged 150 meters (492 feet) of lines along with completely destroying a 60-meter (197-foot) trapezoid. So far the more famous animal figures have...

Photo Of The Day: Morning Landscapes Of Hampi, India

Photo Of The Day: Morning Landscapes Of Hampi, India Mar 15th, 2013 at 6:00PM: The sun rises over boulders, the Tungabhadra River and the ruins of the Vijayanagara Empire's former capital to make a gorgeous golden landscape in today's Photo Of The Day, taken by Arun Bhat. Located in southwest India, this tide of rocks and history are a part of the Hampi World Heritage Site. At its height, the ancient capital was the largest city in the world. Now, it's home to countless...

Tallinn's Medieval Old Town

Tallinn's Medieval Old Town Feb 18th, 2013 at 10:00AM: Tallinn is a medieval wonderland. The capital of Estonia isn't on a lot of people's bucket list but anyone at all interested in history, architecture or art will love this place. The central attraction is Old Town, a medieval walled city filled with old buildings and fortifications. The sheltered bay and the easily defended Toompea Hill made it a natural place to settle. Sometime about 1050...

Israel Restores Ancient City

Israel Restores Ancient City Feb 1st, 2013 at 4:00PM: The government of Israel has just completed a $2 million restoration of the ancient Nabatean city of Avdat, The Jewish Press reports. Avdat is in the Negev Desert and was one of the westernmost points on an extensive incense trade network the Nabateans built stretching as far as the southern Saudi peninsula that flourished from the 3rd century B.C. to the 2nd century A.D. Incense was...

Damage To Timbuktu's Antiquities Not As Bad As Originally Thought

Damage To Timbuktu's Antiquities Not As Bad As Originally Thought Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:00AM: Earlier this week we reported on the possible destruction of Timbuktu's collection of medieval manuscripts. Now it turns out those initial reports were exaggerated. Timbuktu in Mali is a UNESCO World Heritage Site thanks to its many shrines to Muslim saints and its collection of some 300,000 manuscripts dating as far back as the beginning of the 13th century. They're in several languages and...

Did Islamists Destroy The Priceless Medieval Manuscripts Of Timbuktu?

Did Islamists Destroy The Priceless Medieval Manuscripts Of Timbuktu? Jan 29th, 2013 at 5:00PM: Timbuktu is now safe from the ravages of the Islamists of northern Mali, thanks to a French-led offensive that has been kicking some fundamentalist derrière for the past couple of weeks. Since April 2012, the city had been under the control of Ansar Dine (Defenders of Faith) who imposed a harsh version of Sharia law, cutting the hands off thieves, flogging men for talking to women in...

New Agers Trash Mayan Pyramid At 'End Of The World' Party

New Agers Trash Mayan Pyramid At 'End Of The World' Party Dec 26th, 2012 at 11:00AM: Revelers at an Apocalypse party at the ancient Mayan site of Tikal in Guatemala have damaged one of the pyramids, AFP reports. Temple II, built at Tikal's height around 700 A.D., was damaged when a crowd of partygoers ignored signs saying it was off-limits and climbed up it anyway. An official at the site didn't reveal how extensive the damage was but did say it was permanent. About 7,000...

Islamists Renew Attack On Timbuktu's Heritage

Islamists Renew Attack On Timbuktu's Heritage Dec 24th, 2012 at 4:00PM: The ancient treasures of Timbuktu have come under renewed attack by Islamists, the BBC reports. The Islamist group Ansar Dine (Defenders of Faith) has vowed to destroy all the city's medieval shrines of Muslim saints, which they say are contrary to Islam. The city in northern Mali has been under the control of a coalition of Tuareg and Islamist rebels since April. They declared the...

Creationist Audio Tour Removed From Giant's Causeway

Creationist Audio Tour Removed From Giant's Causeway Oct 3rd, 2012 at 4:00PM: The National Trust has removed a controversial creationist segment in their audio presentation from the visitor center at Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland, the BBC reports. The National Trust, which manages the geological marvel and UNESCO World Heritage Site, opened a new visitors center there in July. Soon there were numerous complaints about one segment of the audio tour that stated...

Syrian Civil War Fueled By Illegal Antiquities Trade

Syrian Civil War Fueled By Illegal Antiquities Trade Sep 14th, 2012 at 12:00PM: We've reported before here on Gadling how the unrest in Syria has led to the damage of much of that nation's archaeological heritage. Now Time magazine reports that the Syrian Civil War has led to a huge trade in illegal antiquities that may be lengthening the war. Smugglers and antiquities dealers in Lebanon told the magazine that both the Free Syrian Army and the Syrian government are...

Video: Virtual Tour Of Maeshowe, Scotland

Aug 30th, 2012 at 2:30PM: I recently had the good fortune to visit the Orkney Islands to the north of Scotland and saw that region's amazing prehistoric archaeology. One of the most impressive monuments was the large vaulted burial chamber of Maeshowe. It was built around 2700 B.C., making it older than the pyramids at Giza, and is a masterpiece of stonework. Maeshowe is also famous for its much later (but still old)...

Amazing 3-D Laser Scan Of Lalibela Rock-Hewn Churches In Ethiopia

Aug 23rd, 2012 at 9:00AM: Of all the incredible monuments in Ethiopia, the rock-hewn churches of Lalibela are by far the most impressive. Starting in the 12th century A.D., Ethiopian rulers dug a series of churches out of the solid bedrock. This architecture-in-reverse creates a bizarre and otherworldly scene. As you walk along the exposed rock, you come across giant holes in the stone filled with churches. Narrow...

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