Skip to Content

Click on a label to read posts from that part of the world.

Map of the world

Norwegian Town Will Finally Get Sunlight During the Winter

Karl Martin Jakobsen, Visit Norway

Imagine what it would be like to never see the sun.

In the Norwegian town of Rjukan, that's exactly what life is like six months out of the year. Located in a valley, because of the high mountains that surround the town, from September to March there is no sunlight. But this year, that will change.

At the end of October, the town will install three giant sun mirrors, in order to reflect sun into the town square, bringing sunlight in the middle of the winter for the first time to the town's 3,000 inhabitants.

It's Finally Easier to Get to Bhutan

Xioajun Deng, Flickr


Bhutan might be most well-known for its Gross National Happiness Index, but it's also an excellent destination for any adventure-seeking traveler on the lookout for outdoor exploits.

Situated at the eastern end of the Himalayas, Bhutan isn't the easiest place to get to, but with the launch of the country's second airline, that could soon change. Up until now, the state-owned Drukair was the only airline available to the country, but tapping into the aviation infrastructure of next door neighbor Thailand, now the Bhutanese and travelers to Bhutan also have access to Bhutan Airlines.

The Government is Back Up and Running, and So Are the National Parks

Grand Canyon National Park, Flickr

Everyone rejoice: now that the shutdown is finally over, government employees can get back to work and the rest of us can go out and explore any National Park that we feel like. No sneaking around with the risk of getting fined, you can now travel as you wish.

While some National Parks found ways to open back up during the shutdown, thanks to a handful of states that opted to pay the federal government to keep their parks functioning, today the 400 some National Parks will open back up as the furlough for the 20,000 park employees ends.

The Grossest Coffee on the Planet?

davidd, Flickr


We've covered crazy high-end coffees before. One of the world's most expensive coffees, kopi luwak, comes from Indonesia, where the beans are harvested from the feces of the wild civet. Apparently something amazing happens to the beans in the digestion process, or at least the coffee world would have us believe so.

Then there's Black Ivory Coffee, which of course comes to us thanks to elephant dung. The elephants stomachs are apparently like a "natural slow cooker" for the beans.

But now there's a new coffee contender on the block, and you don't have to travel to the other side of the world. All you have to do is make your way to... you guessed it, Portlandia.

Shutdown Won't Stop Travel: Tourists Are Sneaking Into Grand Canyon and Zion National Parks

Stuart Seeger, Flickr

Not allowed to go where you want to on account of the government shutdown? That doesn't pose a problem for some. Because hey, if you've traveled far to see a certain landmark, you're going to do everything in your power to see it. Or at least that is the thought pattern of the people who have been sneaking into Grand Canyon National Park recently. May we remind you that such behavior is in fact illegal.

Nearly two dozen people have been issued citations for entering the park; you see the government and the National Parks can get shut down, but someone will still be employed to get you in trouble when you make an attempt at entering.

Amazing U.S. Map Given to the First Transcontinental Air Travelers

David Rumsey Map Collection

If you were lucky enough to be one of the first people to experience commercial transcontinental air travel in 1929, then you were lucky enough to receive this map.

On the backside of the map is a a weather diagram, a "Certificate of Flight" and a flight log for the passenger to fill out. At 14x30 inches, these days the map would have made for a beautiful poster, but it also folded down to be more pocket-friendly.

Couple Aims to Travel Using Only Virtual Currency

Zach Copley, Flickr

For the last two months, Beccy and Austin Craig haven't spent any cash. Well, they've spent money, but all of their transactions are with the virtual currency called Bitcoin. Yes, that's the same stuff that all the transactions on illegal drug website Silk Road were made in.

But apparently it can be used by a sweet couple from Utah too. They use it for all of their daily shopping, including gas and food, and now they're taking it international: next week the couple is road tripping to New York City and from there they will fly to Stockholm. And it will all be done on Bitcoin, a decentralized, peer-to-peer digital currency.

5 Easy Ways To Stay Active When You Travel

Ed Yourdon, Flickr


Traveling doesn't mean having to give up your regular workout routines, even when you're on vacation and letting yourself relax a little. There are plenty of travel specific workouts to be done, from CrossFit to general hotel gym repetitions, but the best, and easiest, way to stay active while you travel is to do just that: stay active. Here are five easy ways to do just that.

1. Do a morning yoga session
A round of sun salutations every morning will get you ready for the day as well as keep your muscles happy. Plan on a short and simple yoga routine that you can incorporate into your morning before your day gets hectic.

Warm Crap In A Bag: Does Anthony Bourdain Really Affect How People Think About Food?

Parts Unknown, CNN

As part of CNN's "Parts Unknown" show, Anthony Bourdain went to New Mexico to check out Santa Fe's Five & Dime General Store, which is very well known for its Frito Pie. It didn't end well.

Holding the bag of Frito chips covered in chili and topped with cheese, Bourdain proceeded to refer to it as "warm crap in a bag." Granted, he was just trying to give viewers an idea of what Frito Pie feels like when you hold it, and he did say himself that the dish was "delicious."

The Shutdown Affects Travel, Twitter Responds As Usual

Budget Battle
AP
The government shutdown is officially happening, and various travel-related agencies are being affected, most notably National Parks. Air traffic controllers are still hard at work, but there's no way Yosemite will be able to celebrate its 123rd birthday (although Google is trying hard).

As usual, people are responding to the shutdown and its affects on travel on Twitter.

Some are concerned about the international tourists:


Some are hopeful that eventually things will get back to normal:

Gadling Features

Most Popular

Categories

Become our Fan on Facebook!

Featured Galleries (view all)

La Convención: A Festival Of 'New Circus' In Buenos Aires
The S. Pellegrino Cooking Cup
Disappear From The Map On These Independent Islands
Moynaq, Uzbekistan
Dallol, Ethiopia
Svalbard: The World's Northernmost Inhabited Place
The National Bonsai and Penjing Museum
10 Islands To Visit Next
Revere Hotel Boston Common

Find Your Hotel

City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport code
If different
POWERED BY
POWERED BY

Budget Travel

DailyFinance

FOXNews Travel

Frommer's

Engadget

Eurocheapo

Lonely Planet

New York Times Travel

Joystiq