Skip to Content

Click on a label to read posts from that part of the world.

Map of the world

The Joys of Traveling Solo

woman with suitcase
Rob, Flickr
As travel writers, taking solo trips goes with the territory, so to speak. Sometimes, we're able to take along significant others or friends, but that's the exception. For my part, I prefer to travel alone, be it work or pleasure (which, given my occupation, generally turns into work in some form).

I just returned from a two-week-long solo assignment in Hawaii; it was my 15th visit, 14 of which have been made solo. In the early and mid-90s, I lived on Maui, and those experiences are what really cemented my love of traveling by myself, even in a place marketed to, and dominated by, couples. Sure, it can be lonely or a bit depressing at times to be a lone nomad, but I prefer to focus on the numerous advantages:
  • You generally get more of a cultural immersion when you're by yourself. Depending upon where you are, locals may either pity you or find you an object of curiosity. This results in invites to dinner in private homes or to local events, and other experiences not easily had when you're a twosome or in a group.
  • There's no one to get pissed off at you when you inevitably get lost.


Salar de Uyuni
Laurel Miller, Gadling
  • You'll likely get more out of your trip, because you can focus on your interests.

  • Even without someone to watch your luggage while you purchase train tickets or run to the bathroom, it's usually less stressful to travel alone. Bickering is inevitable, no matter how great your relationship, be it romantic or platonic.
  • Locals are usually happy to show you the sights. Again, this depends upon where you are, but by way of example, on a recent trip to Paraguay, I encountered palpable national pride among every single person I met. Everyone was eager to show me why their country is incredible (and it is).
  • Per the above, you'll see things "tourists" don't, like hidden waterfalls, swimming holes, sacred sites, rituals, festivals, etc. As with accepting an invitation to someone's home, you need to use good judgment so you don't compromise your safety, but without question, my best travel experiences have come about in this manner.
  • Watching a sunset alone on a deserted beach is highly underrated.
  • You may save money; single rooms can be less expensive and cover charges are often waived for women.
  • While I don't often go out alone at home, I usually love to grab a drink at a dive bar when I travel. It's a great way to meet locals as well as like-minded fellow travelers (who are always happy to share tips).
  • I find I push yourself more when I travel by myself. My friends aren't as adventurous or outdoorsy as I am (they might use the term "dirtbaggy"), so hostels, janky buses and ferries, extreme sports, weird street foods and backpacking are out. I happily partake in these activities on my own, which has also been a big confidence-builder.

Filed under: Arts and Culture, Learning, Festivals and Events, Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, Oceania, South America, Antarctica, Ecotourism, Budget Travel, Central America, Caribbean, Women's Travel, Luxury Travel

Find Your Hotel

City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport code
If different
POWERED BY
POWERED BY

Search Travel Deals

Reader Comments (Page 1 of 1)

Gadling Features


Most Popular

Categories

Become our Fan on Facebook!

Featured Galleries (view all)

Berlin's Abandoned Tempelhof Airport
The Junk Cars of Cleveland, New Mexico
United Airlines 787 Inaugural Flight
Ghosts of War: France
New Mexico's International Symposium Of Electronic Arts
Valley of Roses, Morocco
The Southern Road
United Dreamliner Interior
United Dreamliner Exterior

Our Writers

Don George

Features Editor

RSS Feed

View more Writers

Weird News

DailyFinance

FOXNews Travel

Engadget

Sherman's Travel

Lonely Planet

New York Times Travel

Joystiq