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The Pacific Ocean: Is It Really True That One-Third Of Young Americans Can't Find It?

Pacific OceanWhile reading fellow Gadling blogger Chris Owen's post about a Twitter mix-up between Chechnya and the Czech Republic, I was horrified to read that one-third of young Americans can't find the Pacific Ocean.

I was horrified, but not surprised. I taught for several years in a community college and no amount of public ignorance surprises me anymore – not after a student handed in a paper stating that Iraq and Afghanistan were cities.

But I'm always suspicious of statistics. It's a well-known fact that 85 percent of all statistics are wrong, so I emailed Chris and asked for his source, which turned out to be the Around the World geography project. They cite a National Geographic study that found 29 percent of U.S. 18-24 year olds couldn't find the Pacific Ocean on an unlabeled map.

Looking at the original study, it turns out they got it wrong. "Only" 21 percent of those quizzed couldn't find the Pacific Ocean. The 2006 study quizzed 510 Americans aged 18-24 on a number of geographic issues. The one that concerns us here was a blank map test to see if the participants could correctly point out certain countries and geographic locations. Boundaries were clearly labeled; they simply needed to match the shape and location with the country or ocean.

The Pacific Ocean wasn't the only hard-to-find location. A staggering 63 percent couldn't find Iraq, despite near-constant media coverage. Closer to home, 50 percent couldn't find New York state. Check out the link to read more disheartening statistics.

I suppose we could blame the educational system, but 48 percent of the participants said they had a geography class sometime between sixth grade and senior year, so I suspect the blame lies with parents for not instilling a desire to learn about the world and the young Americans themselves for not realizing this information could be useful.

When I was discussing this post at the breakfast table my7-year-old scoffed, "I know where the Pacific Ocean is!"

I decided to test him. He correctly pointed out the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, as well as the Mediterranean and Red Seas. I stumped him on the Sea of Azov, though. Can't let him get too big for his britches.

Of course he enjoys a key advantage – parents who channel his natural childhood curiosity into learning about the world around him and foster an enthusiasm for exploration and discovery.

In other words, we give a shit about his education.


[Image of the Pacific Ocean courtesy NASA]

Filed under: Learning, North America, United States

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