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4 Big Travel Fears And How To Overcome Them


When I meet people who tell me they've never flown on an airplane or stepped foot outside their home state, I'm always a little taken aback. In this day and age when travel is so accessible, affordable and commonplace, it's amazing that there are still so many travel virgins out there.

Now, of course, if these folks didn't want to travel, or were unable to afford it, that would be understandable. But it's not lack of desire or means that seems to hold so many people back. Instead, it's fear – fear of heading out into the great unknown and fear of what will go wrong when they get there. And this fear is crippling enough to stop them from living out their travel dreams.

But the good news for travel newbies is that fears can be overcome. It's just a matter of understanding what you're really scared of and learning to manage your concerns. Here are the four biggest fear-related excuses I hear from would-be travelers and tips on how to cope with them.

Going abroad is dangerous


This is probably the most common excuse I hear for not traveling. In fact, the idea that foreign places are dangerous is so pervasive that many people not only stop themselves from traveling, but they try to prevent others from doing so as well. "Are you really planning to go there? Do you think it's wise? Have you heard the news reports about xyz?" are all refrains I've heard over and over. But here's the thing: life is dangerous and bad things can happen to you anywhere. Despite this, we tend to be afraid of the big, catastrophic events that are actually quite rare (such as our plane crashing, or being kidnapped abroad), but less afraid of more common dangers (such as car accidents) that happen all the time.

So how can you quash this fear? First, do some research. People are often afraid of travel because they don't know what to really expect. In other words, fear of going abroad is really just fear of the unknown. By learning about your destination, you can start to feel more comfortable with the idea of visiting it. You might even be surprised to learn that your destination is less dangerous than where you live.

Also, remember that news reports tend to focus mostly on negative events, giving you a disproportionate image of how dangerous a country really is. Even in countries that do have genuine problems, not all parts of the country are necessarily dangerous. So just because you saw a story about a shooting or hostage situation in one city doesn't mean the popular tourist town you'll be visiting has the same problems. The best way to know for sure is to read detailed travel advisories.

At the end of the day, as long as you use common sense (avoid dark alleys, keep an eye on your belongings and so on) you'll be just fine.

I won't be able to communicate my needs


If all you have in your language arsenal is a bit of high school Spanish, then it's normal to feel anxious about heading to a country where you won't be able to understand a word of the local lingo. But of all the fears on this list, not being able to communicate is probably the most unfounded. Remember, English is widely spoken around the world, and even those who don't speak it may have enough of a basic understanding to be able to help you out. And the people you're most likely to come into contact with – those working in the hospitality industry – will almost certainly know some English.

If you're still worried, it might be a good idea to prepare yourself by learning a few key words and phrases in the local language. Things like, "where is the toilet?", "I want chicken/beef/pork," "I want a single/return ticket" and so on, always come in handy. Of course, "please" and "thank you" also go a long way when you're seeking help from locals.

Other ways around the language barrier include carrying phrase books, flash cards or picture books bearing images of things you commonly need when traveling. You could also try using gestures or miming to get your point across – it may feel silly but it works.

At the end of the day, there are very few places in the world where you'll struggle to get by without the local language and if you're a first-time traveler, chances are these places are not on your itinerary anyway.

What if I get sick or hurt?


Falling ill or being injured abroad are unlikely but not altogether impossible scenarios. So the key to getting around this fear is to be prepared. Firstly, recognize that most health problems people have when traveling are minor – according to this list of the most common travel diseases, diarrhea is the number one ailment. Carrying a small first-aid kit with a few common over-the-counter meds should get you through most situations, but if not, remember there are pharmacies just about everywhere.

Of course, a stomach bug is not what most people are really worried about. It's the bigger health emergencies that could end in a visit to a scary foreign hospital that gets travelers anxious. But it's worth noting that many international health systems are better than you think. India, for example, has earned a reputation for its highly experienced heart surgeons, while Thailand is top a destination for medical tourism because of its internationally accredited facilities. Moreover, many developing countries often have large expat communities, so sleek hospitals with highly-trained English speaking staff have sprung up to serve them. If you have a pre-existing condition or are simply anxious, find out where these expat-oriented hospitals are and keep a list of them when traveling.

Lastly, get up to date on all your vaccinations and make sure you have good health insurance that will cover you while you're abroad.

What if I lose my passport/credit cards/wallet?


Losing your documents is a nuisance, for sure, but it doesn't have to ruin your whole trip. I once had an ATM swallow my debit card at a bus station in Bolivia ... 15 minutes before I was about to board a bus for a distant city. What did I do? Well, I wanted to be sure that no one would figure out a way to retrieve my card from the machine and use it, so I borrowed a cellphone from a kind passerby, called the bank and canceled my card right there on the spot. They promised to express post a new card and a few days later, it was in my hands. Life certainly went on despite the little hiccup, especially because I had other cards to fall back on.

Rogue ATMs aren't the only threat to your valuables, in fact, pick-pocketing is much more likely. Still, this doesn't have to be a trip-ending nightmare at all. Just be sure not to carry all your credit cards and cash in your wallet everyday – it's best to leave most of it in your hotel safe and only tote around what you'll need for the day. Should the worst happen, call your credit card company right away, cancel the lost card, and they'll express a new one out to you.

When it comes to passports, again, don't carry it around unless you have a good reason to. If it does go MIA, you'll have a much easier time getting a replacement passport if you've made copies of it. Keep one copy with you and leave another with a trusted friend back home, just to cover all bases. Your nearest embassy or consulate should be able to help you out from there.

At the end of the day, remember that if the trip really turns out to be as horrible as you imagined, you can always turn around and come home. However, chances are, once you take those first steps and get going, you'll discover all the wonderful things about life on the road and want to stay. If anything, you'll probably wonder why you didn't do it sooner.

What kinds of fears stop you from traveling? Have you found ways of managing them? Let us know below!

[Photo credits: Flickr users cvander; shock264; Fields of View; gwire; swimparallel]

Filed under: Travel Health, Travel Security

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