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Intense National Geographic Series, 'Locked Up Abroad,' Documents Inept Travelers

muleLast week's arrest of diaper-wearing cocaine smugglers at JFK proved more laughable than horrifying to those not directly involved. Drug busts are in the media so often, we rarely pay attention to them. They're certainly not something I care about.

Yet, I've recently become obsessed with a National Geographic show called "Locked Up Abroad." I don't recall hearing about this harrowing documentary series when it first aired in 2007, but it caught my eye about a month ago, during a late-night Netflix bender. It's now in its sixth season on the National Geographic Channel.

Each episode profiles one or two subjects, most of whom have been imprisoned in developing nations. While a few episodes detail hostage and other kidnapping situations (Warning: if you're at all easily disturbed, please don't watch ... nightmares are almost guaranteed), most involve drug smuggling gone awry.

As a die-hard adventure traveler, I find "Locked Up Abroad" absorbing (that's not an intentional diaper pun) because it's a real-life dramatization of my worst fears. As a solo female wanderer, I can't help but worry sometimes about kidnapping or becoming an inadvertent drug mule, no matter how self-aware I try to be. Many of the episodes on "Locked Up Abroad," however, involve people with the intellect of dead hamsters, and it's hard to feel much in the way of empathy, given their greed and gullibility.
Still, it's hard to resist a good prison story, especially when it involves South America or Bangladesh, and pasty, bespectacled English blokes or naive teenage girls from small-town Texas. The psychology behind why these people take such enormous risks, and how they manage to survive in inhospitable and downright inhumane conditions is fascinating.

Perhaps I've just watched "Midnight Express," "Brokedown Palace," and "Return to Paradise" one too many times, but I've often wondered how I'd fare in such a situation, and I hope I never have to find out. But documentaries like "Locked Up Abroad" are more than just sensationalism. They're a window into our desperate, greedy, grubby little souls, as well as testimony to the will to survive.

For some reason, YouTube and National Geographic Channel video links are disabled or broken, so if you want to check out some footage, click here.

[Photo credit: Flickr user Svadilfari]

Filed under: Learning, Business, Stories, Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, Bangladesh, United States, Video, Budget Travel, What's in Your Pack?, Middle East, Travel Security

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