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Ancient Curses Uncovered In Two Countries

ancient curses, curses, curse, Carlisle
It's been a good week for ancient curses.

A "cursing stone" has been discovered on the Isle of Canna, Scotland. More precisely called a bullaun stone, they're natural or artificial depressions in a stone that catch rainwater and give it magical properties, usually to heal or to help women conceive a child. A shaped stone is placed in the hole that's turned to make a prayer or curse.

The bullaun stone on the Isle of Canna is at the base of an early Christian cross dating to about 800 A.D. Now a round stone carved with a cross has been found that fits exactly into this depression. While bullaun stones are found in several European countries, it's uncommon for both the stone and the base to be preserved.

Over in Italy, two ancient curses have been translated. A Spanish researcher working at the Archaeological Museum of Bologna has revealed the text of two curses inscribed on lead tablets in Roman times. Called a defixio, such curses were common in Greek and Roman times and often came mass produced with only the name of the target needing to be filled in. The ones in Bologna target an animal doctor and a senator, making it the first such curse found against a Roman senator.

One reads in part, "Crush, kill Fistus the senator. . .May Fistus dilute, languish, sink and may all his limbs dissolve ..." The one against the animal doctor is no less nasty: "Destroy, crush, kill, strangle Porcello and wife Maurilla. Their soul, heart, buttocks, liver. . ."

Many museums have examples of these ancient nastygrams. One at the British Museum was found in London and curses a woman's memory. Since it's the only record of her to survive, it appears the curse worked.

Curses can be found all over the place. In Carlisle I came across a cursing stone made in 1525 by the Archbishop of Glasgow against the Border Reivers, Scottish raiders who stole English livestock. There's a photo of it above. You can read the text of the curse in my article about Carlisle.

Filed under: Arts and Culture, History, Learning, Europe, Italy, United Kingdom

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