Skip to Content

Click on a label to read posts from that part of the world.

Map of the world

Eagle Creek Traverse Pro Roller Bag

I'm not ashamed to admit that I've made the full jump to the roller bag. It's what I pack now, unless I'm traveling super light, and then I just take a little day pack. The perfect bag remains just out of reach, though I've noticed some real improvements since I got my Costco standard sized carry on a few years back. Luggage is lighter and more versatile these days, and generally more thoughtfully designed.

The Traverse Pro is a combination bag -- a day pack and suitcase in one. There's a TSA friendly zip-off backpack and a standard roller bag. The bag is overhead bin sized even with the day pack on it, though if you've really stuffed it tight and you're on a smaller plane, you may find you can't stow the whole thing in the bin. To test the bag, I packed for a short weekend away, I flew to my destination --that's how I know about the overhead bin issue.

I wasn't thrilled with packing the Traverse, though it's easier to manage with the auxiliary backpack zipped off. The bag zips most of the way open with a large flap; I wanted it it to open all the way and to lay flat and it doesn't quite do that. It's not a dealbreaker, it's just a minor detail that could be improved.

The bag has your standard "keep your stuff in place" straps and the inside of the lid is a full zippered pocket for your lose items. There are two outside pockets on the front, one big sleeve, one smaller. You have to keep in mind that they're not easy to get to if you've got the day pack zipped on, so don't put your boarding pass in there.

The bag was easy to wheel around -- I liked the locking handle and the maneuverability of the wheels -- those things can be clunky sometimes, the handle sticks or the wheels just aren't smooth. This bag has nice base hardware and is easy to move around. Plus, it's light compared to anything else I've tested in this category. The zipper pulls are nice -- they have those round, finger tip shaped things that make the bag easy to open and close, but the zippers themselves were a little resistant when going around the corners on the bag.
The day pack is handy, and it's a nice one, it's got padded straps and a sleeve for your laptop. It's got some nice organizer pockets sized right to hold your phone or your pocket camera. There's a key hook which is great if you're me and you're always digging in the depths or your bag to find your house key while you're on the front porch in the rain. It doesn't have external water bottle pockets, something I always want on a pack and something that seems to be often left off a luggage system. (See also, this review of the Airporter pack.)

Top and side grips make the bag easy to deal with when you're hefting it in and out of the rental car trunk, or again, up into that overhead bin. There's a nice little luggage tag sleeve on the side that tucks out of the way -- a small detail that I'm seeing on newer bags and really appreciating. I've had airlines lose my bags repeatedly and knowing that there's ID on them helps. (Sidebar: I have also always had my bags find me. Up to five days later, but still, they find me.)

Eagle Creek pairs this bag with a recommended, optional packing system which I also tried out. It includes a couple of packing cubes and a folder. I'm coming around to the idea of packing cubes for things like socks and underwear, the smaller bits that go wandering around the inside of your bag. Eagle Creek makes their own, but candidly, I'm not brand loyal and hey, I used to just use plastic shopping bags. I still do for dirty laundry.

Eagle Creek suggests you include their Pack-It Folder. It's the exact size of the base of the bag -- you fold your stuff up inside it, cinch it down, and it stays nice and flat. There's even a folding guide for the folding challenged. Thing is, I can fold like no one's business. While it's tempting to stuff my clothes into a great wrinkly wad, I don't. I don't need a folding system. You might. If you're packing challenged and just can't make yourself fold your shirts properly, this is going to help you out a lot. And if you're traveling for business or need to look pulled together, a folding system is worth checking out as a crutch. My shirts did stay nice and neat, I didn't have to iron.

Get the bag and the packing system directly from Eagle Creek -- the bag retails for just over 300USD. Bits and pieces in the packing system go from 15-40 USD.

Filed under: Gadling Gear Review

Find Your Hotel

City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport code
If different
POWERED BY
POWERED BY

Search Travel Deals

Gadling Features


Most Popular

Categories

Become our Fan on Facebook!

Featured Galleries (view all)

Berlin's Abandoned Tempelhof Airport
The Junk Cars of Cleveland, New Mexico
United Airlines 787 Inaugural Flight
Ghosts of War: France
New Mexico's International Symposium Of Electronic Arts
Valley of Roses, Morocco
The Southern Road
United Dreamliner Interior
United Dreamliner Exterior

Our Writers

Don George

Features Editor

RSS Feed

View more Writers

Weird News

DailyFinance

FOXNews Travel

Engadget

Sherman's Travel

Lonely Planet

New York Times Travel

Joystiq