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Google acquires ITA: the search for bargain airline deals is about to get even easier

You're an avid traveler, right? Sure, why else would you be reading this? Chances are that you've spent some quality time at either Kayak, Airfare Watchdog, Bing Travel or one of the many other niche ticketing sites in search of deals over the past few months. To that end, you've probably spent next to no time at Google searching for the same thing. But the obvious question is this: "why not?"

That's a question that has obviously been bugging Google, which is a master of all things search in most every other category. For whatever reason, Google has allowed a number of other, typically smaller competing sites to grow their user base without any interference. But if Google's so great at finding images via keyword, remedies to your strange medical conditions or more details on that vehicle you've been meaning to investigate, why can't it do the same for travel?

Enter ITA Software, a Cambridge-based software firm that was born from an idea within the minds of a few bright computer scientists from MIT. Currently, the outfit is home to a highly advanced QPX software tool for organizing flight information, which is used by leading airlines and travel distributors worldwide including Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, Bing, Continental Airlines, Hotwire, Kayak, Orbitz, Southwest Airlines, TripAdvisor, United Airlines, US Airways, Virgin Atlantic Airways and others. Moreover, it's now offering a completely new airline passenger reservation system to improve the customer experience. And as of today, the company is an integral part of Google...

Google has ponied up $700 million in order to acquire ITA and turn the tables in the online ticket search business, but what's most interesting here is that there's a good chance the resulting search engine will not only do its own thing, but also bring in results from your existing favorites (Kayak, for instance). In a way, it'll be the ultimate airline ticket search engine, pulling information from every nook and cranny available and organizing it in a way that the Average Joe or Jane can fully understand and take action on.

Once the acquisition is complete, Google aims to "make it easier for you to search for flights, compare flight options and prices and get you quickly to a site where you can buy your ticket." It's important to note that much like Kayak, Google won't actually be selling you an airline ticket directly; it'll simply be providing the access to buy one. Still, this all sounds like a huge win for consumers who are tired of crawling three different airline search engines to get a somewhat comprehensive look at their options, and we personally can't wait for this marriage to officially bear fruit.

[Source: Google]

Filed under: Learning, Business, Airlines, Transportation, Budget Travel, News

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