Skip to Content

Click on a label to read posts from that part of the world.

Map of the world

First impressions of Ethiopia

They say first impressions are lasting impressions, and while that's a cliché, strong first impressions of a country can tell you a lot.

I've been in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, for four days now. My wife has just joined me and I'm treating her to a two-week road trip around the historic northern part of the country to celebrate our tenth anniversary. Memories make the best presents, after all.

This is our first time in sub-Saharan Africa and we've both been taken by surprise, summed up by my wife's assessment of the Ethiopians: "They're like us."

(She's Spanish, so when she says "us" she means Mediterranean people.)

To a great extent they are--in attitudes, priorities, even many mannerisms. With 1500 years of Christianity and an even longer period of nationhood, along with several centuries of Islamic learning and contact with the Mediterranean, Middle East, and South Asia, they've developed a culture similar enough to Southern Europe to be recognizable while different enough to be intriguing.

Take social life, for instance. Ethiopians have a great cafe culture and love to while away the hours sipping coffee, chatting with friends, and reading the paper at their favorite cafe. Addis Ababa has a wealth of cafes, both traditional and modern, to suit every mood. The Ethiopians discovered coffee, and it's equally excellent everywhere, so you pick your place by location and decor.

Their attitude to education is similar to ours too. Private schools abound, the capital has plenty of good bookshops, and every city of any size has at least one university. I'll be taking a closer look at the schools in a later post in the series.

There's a relaxed relationship between the sexes here that's much like our own. While many people frown on premarital sex, that doesn't stop them from having dating. This has a beneficial effect for female Western travelers in that they won't be constantly harassed by chronically lonely men like often happens in northern India and parts of the Middle East. Both male and female travelers will receive a fair amount of innocent flirting, though. Considering how good looking the Ethiopians are, this isn't a bad thing.

I'm ashamed to admit that I thought Addis Ababa was going to be dirty. While it's a poor city, a small army of street sweepers keeps it pretty tidy. They can't stop the dust that blows everywhere, though, and the pollution is as bad as a Western city during rush hour. One stark difference is the poverty. There are countless beggars. Many of them are farmers whose crops have failed and they've been forced to come to the city to find food. Others are handicapped or have suffered injuries that keep them from working. More prosperous Ethiopians readily give to beggars and don't judge them simply because they're poor. This is a pleasant difference from our own culture.

So in the first four days we haven't had any real culture shock. Expats living in Addis Ababa say it's easy to slip into daily life here. The Ethiopians we know in Madrid say the same thing about Spain!

Of course we've only seen the capital city so far and talked to members of only three of Ethiopia's many ethnic groups, so as we travel around Ethiopia for the next two months I suspect we'll discover many differences.

But I bet we'll find some more similarities too.

Filed under: Arts and Culture, Africa, Ethiopia, Budget Travel

Find Your Hotel

City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport code
If different
POWERED BY
POWERED BY

Search Travel Deals

Reader Comments (Page 1 of 1)

Add your comments

Please keep your comments relevant to this blog entry. Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments.

When you enter your name and email address, you'll be sent a link to confirm your comment, and a password. To leave another comment, just use that password.

To create a live link, simply type the URL (including http://) or email address and we will make it a live link for you. You can put up to 3 URLs in your comments. Line breaks and paragraphs are automatically converted — no need to use <p> or <br /> tags.

Gadling Features


Most Popular

Categories

Become our Fan on Facebook!

Featured Galleries (view all)

Berlin's Abandoned Tempelhof Airport
The Junk Cars of Cleveland, New Mexico
United Airlines 787 Inaugural Flight
Ghosts of War: France
New Mexico's International Symposium Of Electronic Arts
Valley of Roses, Morocco
The Southern Road
United Dreamliner Interior
United Dreamliner Exterior

Our Writers

Don George

Features Editor

RSS Feed

View more Writers

Weird News

DailyFinance

FOXNews Travel

Engadget

Sherman's Travel

Lonely Planet

New York Times Travel

Joystiq