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The Spice Isle: What the Grenada guidebooks might not tell you

Grenada is so off the radar for a lot of Americans that it leaves a lot to be learned about the country. (For one, how it's pronounced. Answer: "Gren-ay-da.")

But here are some of the more practical tidbits that I learned while in the island country that might also serve you well on your visit:

Keep your swimsuits to the beach. An indecent exposure law forbids it elsewhere. Cover up, even if it's just a little bit.

Don't wear camouflage. It's illegal to wear it in any color or format.

Ask before taking that photo of someone.
It's good tact in any situation (although goodbye to spontaneity), but I especially felt the need to in Grenada. In fact, a few people called me on it when I didn't. My instinct was to snap photos left and right at the market, but I intentionally stopped to talk about and buy produce first.

US money. Yes, you can use it and businesses accept it.

Go SCUBA diving. Grenada has the most wreck dives (sunken boats) in the Caribbean.

Drive on the left. (Also means walking on the left-hand side). But first, you have to get a local driving permit from the traffic department at the Central Police Station on the Carenage. Present your driver's license and pay a fee of EC$30.

No need to rush the spice-buying. You'll have plenty of opportunities to buy spice and all of the variations of spice products -- for cheap, too. Consider buying it from the shopkeeper that you've just enjoyed a great conversation with.

Say yes to insect repellent. Mosquito bites ended up being the majority of my souvenirs.

Keep some cash on hand for your departure tax. The airport doesn't accept credit cards for the payment. You can use either American or Eastern Caribbean cash. Adults: EC$50 (US$20). Children ages 2-12: EC$25 (US$10).

Stick to one elevation at a time. Grenada is blessed with wonders from the depths of the ocean to the heights of a 2,000-foot-high mountain. But it's such a distance that you'll want to avoid going SCUBA diving and seeing Grand Etang in the same day -- you're sure to get decompression sickness (the bends).

Wait to buy chocolate until later. No doubt you'll want to bring chocolate home (Grenada Chocolate Company makes an especially good kind -- plus it's organic and made small-batch). But if you're like me you don't have a refrigerator in your hotel room, the chocolate is sure to melt, so pick it up at the end.

Hydrate. It's easy to forget that you need to drink more than usual because of the weather -- even when you don't feel thirsty.

Do as the locals do. Go to the beach on Sunday for an authentic Grenadian experience -- you'll find local families lounging on the beach, and kids starting up soccer games.

Keep an ear to the local slang. For one, "bon je" (jai/jay) is used as an exclamation of awe. That said, understanding the local patois can be as difficult as learning any new language.


Alison Brick traveled through Grenada on a trip sponsored by the Grenada Board of Tourism. That said, she could write about anything that struck her fancy. (And it just so happens that these are the things that struck her fancy.) You can read more from her The Spice Isle: Grenada series here.

Filed under: Grenada, Caribbean

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