Skip to Content

Click on a label to read posts from that part of the world.

Map of the world

Clothing not optional at this German hotel

Guests arriving at Hotel Rosengarten better be prepared for their stay, this is not the kind of hotel where you show up at the very last minute, not knowing what to expect.

The hotel in the German Black Forest has a strict "no clothing allowed" policy, and guests are expected to be naked in all common areas.

Of course, nudity is still pretty much a taboo in the United States (unless it is on DVD's made here and sent abroad), but the Germans are so comfortable with nudity, that 2 villages in the vicinity of the hotel are working on legislation that will permit naked hikers to use some of the paths in the area as "nudity approved" routes.

The hotel does have a couple of rules guests will have to adhere to - sex is not allowed in any of the common areas, and photography is only allowed if those being photographed grant permission.

Check the gallery below for some folks who should NEVER go to a clothing-optional resort.

"For more galleries like this, visit Asylum. Be sure to check out their list of 26 places every man should visit!"

Filed under: Germany, Hotels and Accommodations

Find Your Hotel

City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport
City name or airport
POWERED BY
City name or airport code
If different
POWERED BY
POWERED BY

Search Travel Deals

Reader Comments (Page 1 of 2)

Gadling Features


Most Popular

Categories

Become our Fan on Facebook!

Featured Galleries (view all)

Berlin's Abandoned Tempelhof Airport
The Junk Cars of Cleveland, New Mexico
United Airlines 787 Inaugural Flight
Ghosts of War: France
New Mexico's International Symposium Of Electronic Arts
Valley of Roses, Morocco
The Southern Road
United Dreamliner Interior
United Dreamliner Exterior

Our Writers

Don George

Features Editor

RSS Feed

View more Writers

Weird News

DailyFinance

FOXNews Travel

Engadget

Sherman's Travel

Lonely Planet

New York Times Travel

Joystiq